Achille-Claude Debussy
1862 - 1918
composer
Alan Duncan
1895 - 1943
journalist, military
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b Dublin; son of Ellen and James Duncan. Served in Gallipoli as a Captain with the Royal Welch Fusiliers. After contracting dysentery in 1916 he was transferred to a military camp at Aldershot in charge of conscientious objectors at their courts martial. After the war Duncan returned to Dublin, working variously as an arts journalist, in administration at the Abbey Theatre, WB Yeats's secretary, and as a tour guide for Lunn's Travel Agency. M probably met Duncan in 1919 or 1920 and the two formed a warm friendship. In April 1924 Duncan married Belinda Atkinson, and early in 1925 the couple moved to Paris, becoming part of the Irish expatriate circle which included Joyce, and eventually M and Beckett.
Alexander Scriabin
1872 - 1915
composer
Anne Yeats
1919 - 2001
artist
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daughter of WB Yeats
Augustus John
1878 - 1961
artist
Belinda Duncan
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Wife of Alan Duncan
Christopher Wood
1901 - 1930
artist
Conal O'Riordan
1874 - 1948
writer
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Novelist and playwright; associated with the Abbey Theatre in its early years.
Constant Lambert
1905 - 1950
composer
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b London; composer, conductor and writer on music; educated at Christ's Hospital (1915-22), and the Royal College of Music on scholarship. Some of his early interests were French and Russian music, particularly for the ballet. He had a wide circle of writer-friends that included the Sitwells. By 1926, the year he met M, he had been introduced to Diaghileff, and was the first English composer to write for the Ballets Russes. Lambert met M in July 1926 when he became a fellow lodger in Hester Travers Smith's home. By late summer he was writing a ballet for Nijinska, who was directing a company performing at the Teatro Col?n in Buenos Aires. The ballet, which was ultimately entitled Pomona, had a libretto written by M based on the myth of Vertumnus and Pomona. M and Lambert's friendship, never a close one, further deteriorated in 1928 over the first English production of the ballet, and royalties due on publication of Pomona by Oxford University Press.
Domenichino
1581 - 1641
artist
Elizabeth Corbet Yeats
1868 - 1940
artist
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b London. Known as Lollie. Younger sister of WB Yeats. In 1902 she, along with her sister Lily, joined Dun Emer, a crafts factory, founded by Evelyn Gleeson and Augustine Henry. In 1908 the sisters broke away from Dun Emer, founding Cuala Industries, which specialised in printing and embroidery.
Enrique Granados
1867 - 1916
composer
Ezra Pound
1885 - 1972
writer
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b Hailey, Idaho; poet, editor and critic. After graduating from University of Pennsylvania, Pound went to Europe, first to Italy, where he published his first collection of poems, 'A Lume Spento' (1908) then to London (1908-20). Pound was a ceaseless promoter of other artists' and writers' work, as well as of issues he considered important. What little interaction he had with M, roughly between late 1928-1930 centred on the promotion of Gaudier-Brzeska's work, the Censorship in Ireland, and M's monograph 'TS Eliot.'
Francis Wheatley
1747 - 1801
artist
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Wheatley was known for picturesque depictions of the lower class in paintings and drawings.
Francois Boucher
1703 - 1770
artist
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French painter and decorative artist. Studied under Lemoyne. He painted portraits of Madame de Pompadour who became his patron in the 1740s. In 1765 he became court painter to Louis XV. His style was French Rococo. He also designed tapestries for the Beauvais factory and Gobelins porcelain.
Friedrich von Schiller
1759 - 1805
writer
George Balanchine
1904 - 1983
Choreographer
Georges Braque
1882 - 1963
artist
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French painter. Braque first apprenticed to his father who was a house painter. In 1900 he moved to Paris where he studied at the free Academe Humbert (1902-04). Braque was influenced by the Fauve painters, and later by the Cezanne Memorial Exhibition in 1907. Along with Picasso, he is one of the originators of Cubism, and introduced into Cubist paintings typography, as well as the decorator's techniques of wood-graining and marbling. He later developed various personal styles, such as white line drawings incised into blackened plaster plaques, a series of paintings of mantelpieces, pedestal tables, billiard tables, and birds. The still life remained Braque's principal theme from the Gueridon series (1927-30) to the Atelier series (1949-55).
George Yeats
1893 - 1968
artist, writer
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Born Bertha Georgie Hyde-Lees in Wrexham. Married WB Yeats in October 1917. In 1919 their first child Anne was born, and in 1921, their son Michael. By the early 1920s George Yeats was active in Cuala Industries and The Dublin Drama League. MacGreevy probably met George Yeats in 1919, and they remained friends until MacGreevy's death in 1967.
Henri Matisse
1869 - 1954
artist
Hester Meredith Travers-Smith
1868 - 1949
psychic
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Daughter of Edward Dowden, Professor of English Literature at Trinity College Dublin. She was probably introduced to MacGreevy in 1919, and remained intouch with him throughout most of her life. In November 1920 she moved to London, and in 1923 rented a house at 15 Cheyne Gardens. That house, and a later residence at number 17, became MacGreevy's home for the greater part of the time he lived in London (1925-27; 1933-41). Travers Smith was a professional medium, and formed her first circle in 1914. She was conducting a s?ance in the presence of Lennox Robinson when the Lusitania was sunk, and claims to have received a message from Hugh Lane who was one of the drowned. She continued her psychic work in London, writing several books on psychic matters, including one entitled 'Psychic Messages from Oscar Wilde.' She died in London.
James Joyce
1882 - 1941
writer
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b Dublin. Irish novelist. Educated at Clongowes
Wood, Belvedere College and University College
Dublin. After two unsuccessful attempts to live in
Paris, Joyce emigrated there in October 1904 with
Nora Barnacle, whom he had met the previous June.
The teaching Joyce hoped to secure in Paris was not
forthcoming, and the couple went to Trieste, where
Joyce secured a post. The couple spent the next ten
years in Trieste. During that time Joyce wrote
Dubliners and Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.
It was in Trieste that Nora gave birth to their two
children, Giorgio in 1905, and Lucia in 1907. Joyce
began Ulysses in March 1914, and in June 1915 the
Joyce family moved to Z?rich, transferring to Paris
in July 1920. In February 1922 Ulysses was published
by Sylvia Beach, and that Autumn Joyce began to
compile notes for a new book, ultimately published
(after being serialised in various avant garde
publications) in 1939 as Finnegans Wake. MacGreevy
met Joyce in 1924 on his first trip to Paris through
the painter Patrick Tuohy. In 1927, when MacGreevy
took up the position of lecteur d'anglais at the
Ecole Normale in Paris, he resumed contact with
Joyce who soon had him assisting with Finnegans
Wake. MacGreevy was an intimate of the entire Joyce
family, dining out frequently with Nora and Joyce,
attending Joyce's birthday celebrations, the
Dejeuner Ulysse in 1929, and acting as best man at
Giorgio's wedding to Helen Fleischman in 1930.
MacGreevy was invited to contribute an article on
Joyce for Our Exagmination Round His Factification
for Incamination of Work in Progress (1929) and
wrote at least one letter to the editor of The Irish
Statesman (1929) defending Anna Livia Plurabelle.
MacGreevy also introduced Beckett to Joyce when
Beckett arrived in Paris in November 1928.
MacGreevy's contact with Joyce while the two resided
in Paris was intense, but after MacGreevy left Paris
in the early 1930s, they seemed to have had little
further contact.
John Rodker
1894 - 1955
writer
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Poet, novelist, publisher, part of the East London group. First published poems in 'The Egoist' and 'The New Age.' In August 1914 privately printed his 'Poems.' Ceased to write poetry in 1925 and his 'Collected Poems 1912-25' appeared in 1930. He founded the Ovid Press, and in 1920 published Eliot's 'Ara Vos Prec' and Pound's 'Hugh Selwyn Mauberly.' In 1928 he published M's translation of Valéry's 'Introduction to the Method of Leonardo da Vinci.'
Lady Augusta Gregory
Lennox Robinson
1886 - 1958
writer
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b Co Cork; also known as Tinche. In 1897, after seeing an Abbey production at the Cork Opera House, Robinson began to write plays. His first play, 'The Clancy Name, a Tragedy in One Act,' was performed on 8 October 1908 at the Abbey in Dublin. In 1909 Robinson was appointed producer of plays and manager of the Abbey by WB Yeats and Lady Gregory.In 1915 Robinson was hired by the Carnegie United Kingdom Trust to act as part-time Organising Librarian for Newcastle West and Rathkeale (See CUKT). In 1919 Robinson met MacGreevy, and in 1920 when he was hired as Secretary to the newly-established Irish Advisory Committee of the CUKT, he recommended MacGreevy to the Committee as Assistant Secretary. MacGreevy remained Assistant Secretary until 1925, when the Irish Advisory Committee was dissolved due to pressure from the Church. On 8 September 1930, Robinson married Dolly Travers Smith, a union which seemed to have surprised everyone who knew them well. MacGreevy took the announcement of the engagement particularly badly, yet, resumed his friendship with Dolly and Lennox, albeit not at the level previously enjoyed. Even before Robinson's marriage to Dolly Travers Smith, MacGreevy and Robinson's relationship seemed to alternate between love and hate. Nevertheless, MacGreevy and Robinson remained in correspondence until Robinson's death..
Leonardo da Vinci
1452 - 1519
artist, scientist
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Italian painter, sculptor, architect, engineer, and scientist. Apprenticed to Andrea Verrocchio (c.1470). He came under the patronage of Lorenzo de Medici and in 1472 became a master, and a member of the guild of St. Luke. In (1482-99) became artist and technical advisor on architecture and engineering to Ludovico Sforza, Duke of Milan. In 1502 he became military engineer to Cesare Borgia. Worked in Florence (1503-06), Milan (1505-13), Rome (1513-16). In 1517 he joined the court of the French king Francis I, he lived at the royal Chateau de Cloux, near Ambroise, until his death. He is especially noted for the breadth of his genius, as he left many notebooks containing his researches into anatomy, architecture, hydraulics, hydrology, geology, meteorology, mechanics, machinery and gears, military weaponry and fortifications, human and avian flight, optics, mathematics and botany. He was a master of expression, and the use of light and shadow. He painted two Annunciations (c.1472-77), Madonna and Child (c.1474), Portrait of a Young Lady (c.1475-78), St. Jerome (c.1480), Adoration of the Magi (1481), two Virgin of the Rocks (1483, 1508), Lady with an Ermine (c.1490), Last Supper (1495-97), Virgin and Child with St. Ann (1500), Madonna with Yarn-winder (1501), Mona Lisa (1503-06), Battle of Anghiari (1503-06), and St. John the Baptist (c.1516).
Leonard Woolf
1880 - 1969
publisher
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Was a civil servant in Ceylon from 1904-11. In 1912 he married Virginia Stephen, and five years later they founded The Hogarth Press. He was also editor of 'The Nation' (1923-30). M was introduced to Woolf through TS Eliot in 1925, and until M left for Paris (Feb 1927) Woolf gave him small literary reviews to do on a fairly regular basis. In 1928 M submitted a collection of poetry to The Hogarth Press which was ultimately rejected by Lady Gerald Wellesley, their poetry editor at the time.
Mark Wardle
translator
Olivia Shakespear
1863 - 1938
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One time companion of WB Yeats, she was probably introduced to M through Yeats. M and Shakespear's friendship seemed slight, but amicable.
Pablo Picasso
1881 - 1973
artist
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(1881-1973) Spanish painter, sculptor, stage designer, ceramist, and expatriate; Picasso?s artistic career can be divided into a series of overlapping periods, the first of which was the Blue Period (1901-1904). Prompted by the death of his friend Carles Casagemas, Picasso depicted the somber world of the poor, including works such as "Crouching Woman," (1902) and "Old Jew and a Boy," (1903). He then entered into the Rose Period (1904-1906), with subject matter often drawn from circus life. Picasso also took a prominent role in the creation of the Cubism movement. His famous piece, ?Les Demoiselles d?Avignon? (1907) ushered in the ?analytic? phase of Cubism, a style that was influenced by African mask carvings and dominated by a monochromatic palette. A later ?synthetic? phase included larger, more representational forms, as is seen in ?The Three Musicians? (1921) and ?Guernaca? (1937). During World War I, Picasso became involved in set design for a theatrical production called ?Parade.? He also ventured into the world of Surrealism, painting erotic human forms and classical beasts. During his lifetime, Picasso engaged in series of failed love affairs, fathering several illegitimate children before he married Jacqueline Roque in 1961.
Padraic Colum
1881 - 1972
writer
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b Longford; poet, dramatist and folklorist. Colum's early plays, centring on peasant reality, were produced by the Irish National Theatre. After 1914 he was largely resident in the United States working as a lecturer and for publishers. MacGreevy probably met Colum and his wife Mary, a literary critic, through James Joyce in Paris. Their relationship does not seem to have been particularly close, and their correspondence largely centred on publishing matters.
Paul Valery
1871 - 1945
writer
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French poet, essayist, and critic. Valéry
is famous not only for his literary works such as La
Soirée avec Monsieur Teste, and symbolist and
post-symbolist poetry, but for the vast analytic
enterprise of his Cahiers, hundreds of notebooks
written nearly every day at dawn for over 50 years
without thought of publication. MacGreevy was
introduced to Valéry by William Stewart in
1926, when Valéry was at the height of his
fame. MacGreevy was taken with his work and began
translating his Introduction à la méthode de
Léonard de Vinci (1895) into English. After
several years of having difficulty in finding
a publisher, John Rodker brought out the
translation, to largely favourable reviews,
in April 1929.
Philip V of Spain
1683 - 1746
leader
Samuel Beckett
1906 - 1989
writer
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b Foxrock, Co Dublin; novelist, dramatist and poet. Educated at Portora Royal School, Enniskillenand at Trinity College, Dublin where he was a Foundation Scholar. In November 1928 Beckett arrived in Paris to take up the position of lecteur d'anglais at the Ecole Normale Sup?rieure, a post previously held by MacGreevy. Beckett probably met MacGreevy during his first days in Paris, and through MacGreevy was introduced to James Joyce, Charles Prentice, Richard Aldington, and others. Although the two men rarely resided in the same city at the same time after 1930, MacGreevy and Beckett's friendship was particularly close up to the time ofthe Second World War, as the tens of letters by Beckett to MacGreevy, now deposited at Trinity College Dublin, testify. Through the result of MacGreevy's introduction of Beckett to Joyce, Beckett was asked to submit an essay to the apologia for Finnegans Wake, Our Exagmination Round HisFactification for Incamination of Work in Progress (1929); after encouragement from MacGreevy Beckett submitted Whoroscope to the Hours Press competition adjudicated by Aldington (who had not met Beckett up to this point), which he won; and through an introduction by MacGreevy, Beckett's monograph Proust was published by Chatto & Windus (1931).In 1934 Beckett reviewed MacGreevy's Poems, and regularly sent MacGreevy his own work for comment. After the war MacGreevy's and Beckett's correspondence resumed, but the friendship never regained the momentum it had before the war.
Sean O'Casey
1880 - 1964
writer
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playwright
Sergey Pavlovich Diaghilev
1827 - 1929
critic
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art critic and impresario
Thomas MacGreevy
1893 - 1967
critic, museum director, writer
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Poet, literary and art critic, and administrator. Born in Tarbert, Co. Kerry, into a family of farmers and schoolteachers; educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he studied politics and history.He is best known for his strikingly original modernist poetry and for being one of the art critics who championed Irish modernist art and artists between the wars.

He was a prolific writer, publishing more than 350 articles, seven monographs, and a collection of poetry, Poems (1934). He was director of the National Gallery of Ireland, 1950-1963.

Source: The Encyclopedia of Ireland
T S Eliot
1888 - 1965
writer
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b St Louis; poet, playwright and critic. Eliot moved to London in 1914 and resided there until his death, becoming a British subject in 1927. MacGreevy met Eliot in May 1925 through a letter of introduction from WB Yeats. Eliot was generous to MacGreevy, taking articles and book reviews regularly from him for The Criterion from 1925-27, and again in 1934, as well as being one of the first to publish his poetry. The two men formed a professional relationship which bordered on the personal. Eliot was very supportive of MacGreevy, writing several letters of introduction for him for various job opportunities. MacGreevy was also one of the earliest critics of Eliot's poetry when in 1931 Chatto & Windus published his monograph TS Eliot. MacGreevy and Eliot's relationship cooled between 1928-32 when MacGreevy's friendship with Richard Aldington was at its peak, as Aldington's dislike for Eliot seemed to have rubbed off on MacGreevy.
Vivien Eliot
- 1947
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First wife of TS Eliot, whom she married in 1915 after a two-month courtship. She was later institutionalized for many years before her death in 1947.
Walter Rummel
1887 - 1953
composer, musician
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b Berlin; pianist and composer, som of the British pianist Franz Rummel and grandson of Samuel F.B. Morse, inventor of the telegraph; although an American citizen, most of his life was spent in Europe, where he was a friend of Debussy, premiering ten of his piano works, and of Ezra Pound, three of whose poems he set to music. In 1924 M reviewed a concert by Rummel held in Dublin. He was probably introduced to Rummel through George Yeats, who was a close friend, along with her mother and Olivia Shakespear. At Dulac's request he composed music for WBY's The Dreaming of the Bones.
WB Yeats
1865 - 1939
writer
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Born William Butler Yeats in Sandymount, Dublin; poet, playwright, and co-founder of the Abbey Theatre. Brother of painter, Jack B. Yeats. In 1886 'Mosada: A Dramatic Poem' was published, and two years later 'Poems and Ballads of Young Ireland' and 'Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry.' Yeats's interest in theatre began in the early 1890s, coinciding with his interest in Irish legends and his studies of the occult. By Yeats's mid-thirties, his reputation as a poet was firmly established, not only in Ireland, but in England and the United States. By the time MacGreevy met Yeats, perhaps as early as 1919, Yeats was at the height of his powers. MacGreevy soon became an intimate of the Yeats family, often calling into their house on Merrion Square in the evenings. It is not clear why his friendship with the Yeatses cooled in the 1930s, and by the time he moved back to Dublin in 1941, renewing his friendship with George Yeats, WB Yeats had died.
William McCausland Stewart
1900 - 1989
academic
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MacGreevy met Stewart while the two men were
studying at Trinity College Dublin. Stewart took his
BA in 1922, and his MA in 1926. In 1923 he became
lecteur d'Anglais at the Ecole Normale
Supérieure, a post he held until December
1926, when he became a lecturer in French at the
University of Sheffield. When Stewart left the
Ecole, he recommended MacGreevy to the authorities
as his replacement. Although MacGreevy and Stewart's
correspondence seems to have died out c 1930, they
probably renewed their friendship in the 1950s and
1960s when Stewart returned to Dublin as an external
examiner. After Sheffield, Stewart went on to have a
very successful career as an academic in
universities such as the University of St Andrews
and Bristol.