Agnes Bedford
1892 - 1969
musician
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-Biographic Note
London pianist and vocal coach who collaborated with Ezra Pound on Five Troubadour Songs.
Alan Duncan
1895 - 1943
journalist, military
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b Dublin; son of Ellen and James Duncan. Served in Gallipoli as a Captain with the Royal Welch Fusiliers. After contracting dysentery in 1916 he was transferred to a military camp at Aldershot in charge of conscientious objectors at their courts martial. After the war Duncan returned to Dublin, working variously as an arts journalist, in administration at the Abbey Theatre, WB Yeats's secretary, and as a tour guide for Lunn's Travel Agency. M probably met Duncan in 1919 or 1920 and the two formed a warm friendship. In April 1924 Duncan married Belinda Atkinson, and early in 1925 the couple moved to Paris, becoming part of the Irish expatriate circle which included Joyce, and eventually M and Beckett.
Anne Yeats
1919 - 2001
artist
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daughter of WB Yeats
Aodh Ruadh O Domhnaill
1571 - 1602
leader
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Irish Chieftain
Augusta Gregory
1859 - 1932
writer
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b Co Galway; playwright, collector of folk
material, translator, co-founder of the Abbey
Theatre. In 1880 she married the Rt Hon Sir William
Gregory in Dublin. In 1892 William Gregory died, and
two years later she met WB Yeats. In 1897 Yeats
spent the first of twenty summers at Coole Park,
Lady Gregory's home. In 1899 she and Yeats founded
the Irish Literary Theatre, which later became the
Abbey Theatre, in which she continued to be involved
until her death. In 1921 the reconstituted Irish
Advisory Committee of the Carnegie United Kingdom
Trust was established, with Lady Gregory as one of
its members. Through the Trust, she began a short
(probably through 1925), but amicable working
relationship with MacGreevy.
Belinda Duncan
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Wife of Alan Duncan
Domenichino
1581 - 1641
artist
Edith Sitwell
1887 - 1964
writer
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Poetess. Sister of Sir Osbert Sitwell and Sir Sacheverell Sitwell.
Francis Wheatley
1747 - 1801
artist
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Wheatley was known for picturesque depictions of the lower class in paintings and drawings.
Geoffrey Phibbs
1900 - 1956
writer, editor
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b Norfolk (later in life changed his surname to Taylor) raised in Sligo, at the family home at Lisheen; educated at Haileybury. He enlisted in the Officer's Training Corps attached to Queen's University, but the Armistice was signed before he saw action. Phibbs first began publishing poetry in the early 1920s, and by 1928 had two books published with the Hogarth Press (which were, to a large extent, underwritten by Phibbs). In 1924 he married the painter Norah McGuinness, but the marriage broke up when he entered into a ménage ô quatre in 1929 with Robert Graves, Laura Riding, and Graves's wife, Nancy Nicholson (with whom Phibbs later lived when the ménage broke up). Phibbs first met M c 1922 while working as a Carnegie Librarian, and the two had a lively correspondence until Phibbs's abandonment of McGuinness. He died in Dublin.
George Yeats
1893 - 1968
artist, writer
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Born Bertha Georgie Hyde-Lees in Wrexham. Married WB Yeats in October 1917. In 1919 their first child Anne was born, and in 1921, their son Michael. By the early 1920s George Yeats was active in Cuala Industries and The Dublin Drama League. MacGreevy probably met George Yeats in 1919, and they remained friends until MacGreevy's death in 1967.
Herbert Vincent Reade
1870 - 1929
civil servant
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of Ipsden House, Ipsden, Oxfordshire and 32 Palace Gardens Terrace, Kensington worked in the Board of Customs and Excise; one of George Yeats's oldest friends, he was introduced to MacGreevy by Olivia Shakespear in June 1925.
Hester Meredith Travers-Smith
1868 - 1949
psychic
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Daughter of Edward Dowden, Professor of English Literature at Trinity College Dublin. She was probably introduced to MacGreevy in 1919, and remained intouch with him throughout most of her life. In November 1920 she moved to London, and in 1923 rented a house at 15 Cheyne Gardens. That house, and a later residence at number 17, became MacGreevy's home for the greater part of the time he lived in London (1925-27; 1933-41). Travers Smith was a professional medium, and formed her first circle in 1914. She was conducting a s?ance in the presence of Lennox Robinson when the Lusitania was sunk, and claims to have received a message from Hugh Lane who was one of the drowned. She continued her psychic work in London, writing several books on psychic matters, including one entitled 'Psychic Messages from Oscar Wilde.' She died in London.
Hilaire Belloc
1870 - 1953
writer
John Ruskin
1819 - 1900
art historian, writer
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Art and social critic whose influence on the Arts and crafts movement lasted well into the twentieth century.
Lennox Robinson
1886 - 1958
writer
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b Co Cork; also known as Tinche. In 1897, after seeing an Abbey production at the Cork Opera House, Robinson began to write plays. His first play, 'The Clancy Name, a Tragedy in One Act,' was performed on 8 October 1908 at the Abbey in Dublin. In 1909 Robinson was appointed producer of plays and manager of the Abbey by WB Yeats and Lady Gregory.In 1915 Robinson was hired by the Carnegie United Kingdom Trust to act as part-time Organising Librarian for Newcastle West and Rathkeale (See CUKT). In 1919 Robinson met MacGreevy, and in 1920 when he was hired as Secretary to the newly-established Irish Advisory Committee of the CUKT, he recommended MacGreevy to the Committee as Assistant Secretary. MacGreevy remained Assistant Secretary until 1925, when the Irish Advisory Committee was dissolved due to pressure from the Church. On 8 September 1930, Robinson married Dolly Travers Smith, a union which seemed to have surprised everyone who knew them well. MacGreevy took the announcement of the engagement particularly badly, yet, resumed his friendship with Dolly and Lennox, albeit not at the level previously enjoyed. Even before Robinson's marriage to Dolly Travers Smith, MacGreevy and Robinson's relationship seemed to alternate between love and hate. Nevertheless, MacGreevy and Robinson remained in correspondence until Robinson's death..
Leonard Woolf
1880 - 1969
publisher
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Was a civil servant in Ceylon from 1904-11. In 1912 he married Virginia Stephen, and five years later they founded The Hogarth Press. He was also editor of 'The Nation' (1923-30). M was introduced to Woolf through TS Eliot in 1925, and until M left for Paris (Feb 1927) Woolf gave him small literary reviews to do on a fairly regular basis. In 1928 M submitted a collection of poetry to The Hogarth Press which was ultimately rejected by Lady Gerald Wellesley, their poetry editor at the time.
Norah McGuinness
1903 - 1980
artist
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painter
Olivia Shakespear
1863 - 1938
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One time companion of WB Yeats, she was probably introduced to M through Yeats. M and Shakespear's friendship seemed slight, but amicable.
Osbert Sitwell
1892 - 1969
writer
Sacheverell Sitwell
1897 - 1988
writer
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Poet and Critic. Brother of Dame Edith Sitwell and Sir Osbert Sitwell.
Thomas MacGreevy
1893 - 1967
critic, museum director, writer
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Poet, literary and art critic, and administrator. Born in Tarbert, Co. Kerry, into a family of farmers and schoolteachers; educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he studied politics and history.He is best known for his strikingly original modernist poetry and for being one of the art critics who championed Irish modernist art and artists between the wars.

He was a prolific writer, publishing more than 350 articles, seven monographs, and a collection of poetry, Poems (1934). He was director of the National Gallery of Ireland, 1950-1963.

Source: The Encyclopedia of Ireland
T S Eliot
1888 - 1965
writer
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b St Louis; poet, playwright and critic. Eliot moved to London in 1914 and resided there until his death, becoming a British subject in 1927. MacGreevy met Eliot in May 1925 through a letter of introduction from WB Yeats. Eliot was generous to MacGreevy, taking articles and book reviews regularly from him for The Criterion from 1925-27, and again in 1934, as well as being one of the first to publish his poetry. The two men formed a professional relationship which bordered on the personal. Eliot was very supportive of MacGreevy, writing several letters of introduction for him for various job opportunities. MacGreevy was also one of the earliest critics of Eliot's poetry when in 1931 Chatto & Windus published his monograph TS Eliot. MacGreevy and Eliot's relationship cooled between 1928-32 when MacGreevy's friendship with Richard Aldington was at its peak, as Aldington's dislike for Eliot seemed to have rubbed off on MacGreevy.
Walter Rummel
1887 - 1953
composer, musician
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b Berlin; pianist and composer, som of the British pianist Franz Rummel and grandson of Samuel F.B. Morse, inventor of the telegraph; although an American citizen, most of his life was spent in Europe, where he was a friend of Debussy, premiering ten of his piano works, and of Ezra Pound, three of whose poems he set to music. In 1924 M reviewed a concert by Rummel held in Dublin. He was probably introduced to Rummel through George Yeats, who was a close friend, along with her mother and Olivia Shakespear. At Dulac's request he composed music for WBY's The Dreaming of the Bones.
WB Yeats
1865 - 1939
writer
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Born William Butler Yeats in Sandymount, Dublin; poet, playwright, and co-founder of the Abbey Theatre. Brother of painter, Jack B. Yeats. In 1886 'Mosada: A Dramatic Poem' was published, and two years later 'Poems and Ballads of Young Ireland' and 'Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry.' Yeats's interest in theatre began in the early 1890s, coinciding with his interest in Irish legends and his studies of the occult. By Yeats's mid-thirties, his reputation as a poet was firmly established, not only in Ireland, but in England and the United States. By the time MacGreevy met Yeats, perhaps as early as 1919, Yeats was at the height of his powers. MacGreevy soon became an intimate of the Yeats family, often calling into their house on Merrion Square in the evenings. It is not clear why his friendship with the Yeatses cooled in the 1930s, and by the time he moved back to Dublin in 1941, renewing his friendship with George Yeats, WB Yeats had died.
William McCausland Stewart
1900 - 1989
academic
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MacGreevy met Stewart while the two men were
studying at Trinity College Dublin. Stewart took his
BA in 1922, and his MA in 1926. In 1923 he became
lecteur d'Anglais at the Ecole Normale
Supérieure, a post he held until December
1926, when he became a lecturer in French at the
University of Sheffield. When Stewart left the
Ecole, he recommended MacGreevy to the authorities
as his replacement. Although MacGreevy and Stewart's
correspondence seems to have died out c 1930, they
probably renewed their friendship in the 1950s and
1960s when Stewart returned to Dublin as an external
examiner. After Sheffield, Stewart went on to have a
very successful career as an academic in
universities such as the University of St Andrews
and Bristol.
William Michael Yeats
1921
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Son of WB Yeats and George Yeats