AE
1867 - 1935
writer, artist
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Wrote extensively under the pseudonym AE (1867-1935), b Lurgan, Co Armagh; painter, poet, agrarian reformer. Editor, first of the Irish Homestead (1905-23), and later of The Irish Statesman (1923-1930). Russell was one of the major figures of the Irish Literary Renaissance, becominga mentor to many younger writers. MacGreevy and AE's relationship seemed to be an antagonistic one, although their interaction was mostly professional regarding MacGreevy's submissions to The Irish Statesman. In 1932 Russell moved to England after becoming disillusioned with the Irish Free State. He died in Bournemouth three years later.
Anne Yeats
1919 - 2001
artist
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daughter of WB Yeats
Elena Gerhardt
1833 - 1961
singer
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Soprano and mezzo-soprano who performed actively in England. Gerhardt was trained at the Leipzig Conservatory where she became known as an interpreter of German lieder. She first performed in England in 1906, and after World War II she and her husband settled there. She was a favorite singer of the Yeatses.
George Yeats
1893 - 1968
artist, writer
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Born Bertha Georgie Hyde-Lees in Wrexham. Married WB Yeats in October 1917. In 1919 their first child Anne was born, and in 1921, their son Michael. By the early 1920s George Yeats was active in Cuala Industries and The Dublin Drama League. MacGreevy probably met George Yeats in 1919, and they remained friends until MacGreevy's death in 1967.
Herbert Vincent Reade
1893 - 1968
writer, critic
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modern art critic
Hester Meredith Travers-Smith
1868 - 1949
psychic
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Daughter of Edward Dowden, Professor of English Literature at Trinity College Dublin. She was probably introduced to MacGreevy in 1919, and remained intouch with him throughout most of her life. In November 1920 she moved to London, and in 1923 rented a house at 15 Cheyne Gardens. That house, and a later residence at number 17, became MacGreevy's home for the greater part of the time he lived in London (1925-27; 1933-41). Travers Smith was a professional medium, and formed her first circle in 1914. She was conducting a s?ance in the presence of Lennox Robinson when the Lusitania was sunk, and claims to have received a message from Hugh Lane who was one of the drowned. She continued her psychic work in London, writing several books on psychic matters, including one entitled 'Psychic Messages from Oscar Wilde.' She died in London.
Johannes Brahms
1833 - 1897
composer, musician
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German composer and pianist. Encouraged by Schumann, his music was in the German Romantic style. In 1860 he signed a manifesto opposing 'new music' methods adopted by Liszt, and from then was regarded as diametrically opposite to the Wagner school of German music. He moved to Vienna in 1862 where he remained for 35 years. He conducted the Vienna Singakadamie 1863-64 and in 1872 succeeded Rubinstein as art director of the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde, a post he held until 1875. In his lifetime he wrote four symphonies, four concertos and numerous other works for piano and other instruments. He also wrote nearly 200 songs.
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
1749 - 1832
writer
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German poet, novelist and playwright. Goethe held the post of cultural director in the ducal court at Wiemar. Besides writing, he directed in the theatre. Goethe was also interested in science and did research on plant biology. He was an associate of Wieland, Herder, and Schiller. Goethe's masterpiece Faust was first produced in 1808.
John Rodker
1894 - 1955
writer
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Poet, novelist, publisher, part of the East London group. First published poems in 'The Egoist' and 'The New Age.' In August 1914 privately printed his 'Poems.' Ceased to write poetry in 1925 and his 'Collected Poems 1912-25' appeared in 1930. He founded the Ovid Press, and in 1920 published Eliot's 'Ara Vos Prec' and Pound's 'Hugh Selwyn Mauberly.' In 1928 he published M's translation of Valéry's 'Introduction to the Method of Leonardo da Vinci.'
Lennox Robinson
1886 - 1958
writer
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b Co Cork; also known as Tinche. In 1897, after seeing an Abbey production at the Cork Opera House, Robinson began to write plays. His first play, 'The Clancy Name, a Tragedy in One Act,' was performed on 8 October 1908 at the Abbey in Dublin. In 1909 Robinson was appointed producer of plays and manager of the Abbey by WB Yeats and Lady Gregory.In 1915 Robinson was hired by the Carnegie United Kingdom Trust to act as part-time Organising Librarian for Newcastle West and Rathkeale (See CUKT). In 1919 Robinson met MacGreevy, and in 1920 when he was hired as Secretary to the newly-established Irish Advisory Committee of the CUKT, he recommended MacGreevy to the Committee as Assistant Secretary. MacGreevy remained Assistant Secretary until 1925, when the Irish Advisory Committee was dissolved due to pressure from the Church. On 8 September 1930, Robinson married Dolly Travers Smith, a union which seemed to have surprised everyone who knew them well. MacGreevy took the announcement of the engagement particularly badly, yet, resumed his friendship with Dolly and Lennox, albeit not at the level previously enjoyed. Even before Robinson's marriage to Dolly Travers Smith, MacGreevy and Robinson's relationship seemed to alternate between love and hate. Nevertheless, MacGreevy and Robinson remained in correspondence until Robinson's death..
Liam O'Flaherty
1896 - 1984
writer
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b Aran Islands, novelist and short- story writer. He wrote a letter to the editor of 'The Irish Statesman' in 1926 regarding the publication of M's 'Aodh Ruadh O Domhnaill'. He was involved with the Stewarts in the short-lived To-Morrow, a magazine encouraged by WBY; his second novel The Black Soul, based on his birthplace in Aran, was published in 1924 by Jonathan Cape
Olivia Shakespear
1863 - 1938
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One time companion of WB Yeats, she was probably introduced to M through Yeats. M and Shakespear's friendship seemed slight, but amicable.
Paul Valery
1871 - 1945
writer
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French poet, essayist, and critic. Valéry
is famous not only for his literary works such as La
Soirée avec Monsieur Teste, and symbolist and
post-symbolist poetry, but for the vast analytic
enterprise of his Cahiers, hundreds of notebooks
written nearly every day at dawn for over 50 years
without thought of publication. MacGreevy was
introduced to Valéry by William Stewart in
1926, when Valéry was at the height of his
fame. MacGreevy was taken with his work and began
translating his Introduction à la méthode de
Léonard de Vinci (1895) into English. After
several years of having difficulty in finding
a publisher, John Rodker brought out the
translation, to largely favourable reviews,
in April 1929.
Sean O'Casey
1880 - 1964
writer
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playwright
Thomas MacGreevy
1893 - 1967
critic, museum director, writer
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Poet, literary and art critic, and administrator. Born in Tarbert, Co. Kerry, into a family of farmers and schoolteachers; educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he studied politics and history.He is best known for his strikingly original modernist poetry and for being one of the art critics who championed Irish modernist art and artists between the wars.

He was a prolific writer, publishing more than 350 articles, seven monographs, and a collection of poetry, Poems (1934). He was director of the National Gallery of Ireland, 1950-1963.

Source: The Encyclopedia of Ireland
T S Eliot
1888 - 1965
writer
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b St Louis; poet, playwright and critic. Eliot moved to London in 1914 and resided there until his death, becoming a British subject in 1927. MacGreevy met Eliot in May 1925 through a letter of introduction from WB Yeats. Eliot was generous to MacGreevy, taking articles and book reviews regularly from him for The Criterion from 1925-27, and again in 1934, as well as being one of the first to publish his poetry. The two men formed a professional relationship which bordered on the personal. Eliot was very supportive of MacGreevy, writing several letters of introduction for him for various job opportunities. MacGreevy was also one of the earliest critics of Eliot's poetry when in 1931 Chatto & Windus published his monograph TS Eliot. MacGreevy and Eliot's relationship cooled between 1928-32 when MacGreevy's friendship with Richard Aldington was at its peak, as Aldington's dislike for Eliot seemed to have rubbed off on MacGreevy.
WB Yeats
1865 - 1939
writer
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Born William Butler Yeats in Sandymount, Dublin; poet, playwright, and co-founder of the Abbey Theatre. Brother of painter, Jack B. Yeats. In 1886 'Mosada: A Dramatic Poem' was published, and two years later 'Poems and Ballads of Young Ireland' and 'Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry.' Yeats's interest in theatre began in the early 1890s, coinciding with his interest in Irish legends and his studies of the occult. By Yeats's mid-thirties, his reputation as a poet was firmly established, not only in Ireland, but in England and the United States. By the time MacGreevy met Yeats, perhaps as early as 1919, Yeats was at the height of his powers. MacGreevy soon became an intimate of the Yeats family, often calling into their house on Merrion Square in the evenings. It is not clear why his friendship with the Yeatses cooled in the 1930s, and by the time he moved back to Dublin in 1941, renewing his friendship with George Yeats, WB Yeats had died.
William Michael Yeats
1921
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Son of WB Yeats and George Yeats