Aldous Huxley
1894 - 1963
writer
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English novelist, essayist and critic. His early novels, including Limbo (1920), and Those Barren Leaves (1925), are witty evocations of society of the 1920s. His novels of the 1930s concern themselves with political and philosophical issues, and include Brave New World (1932) and Eyeless in Gaza (1936). In 1947 Huxley settled in California, where he lived until his death.
Berthe Morisot
1841 - 1895
artist
Cleopatra
69 - 30
leader
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Ptolemaic Dynasty
Geoffrey Phibbs
1900 - 1956
writer, editor
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b Norfolk (later in life changed his surname to Taylor) raised in Sligo, at the family home at Lisheen; educated at Haileybury. He enlisted in the Officer's Training Corps attached to Queen's University, but the Armistice was signed before he saw action. Phibbs first began publishing poetry in the early 1920s, and by 1928 had two books published with the Hogarth Press (which were, to a large extent, underwritten by Phibbs). In 1924 he married the painter Norah McGuinness, but the marriage broke up when he entered into a ménage ô quatre in 1929 with Robert Graves, Laura Riding, and Graves's wife, Nancy Nicholson (with whom Phibbs later lived when the ménage broke up). Phibbs first met M c 1922 while working as a Carnegie Librarian, and the two had a lively correspondence until Phibbs's abandonment of McGuinness. He died in Dublin.
George Yeats
1893 - 1968
artist, writer
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Born Bertha Georgie Hyde-Lees in Wrexham. Married WB Yeats in October 1917. In 1919 their first child Anne was born, and in 1921, their son Michael. By the early 1920s George Yeats was active in Cuala Industries and The Dublin Drama League. MacGreevy probably met George Yeats in 1919, and they remained friends until MacGreevy's death in 1967.
Herbert Spencer
1820 - 1903
scientist, philosopher
James Barry
1741 - 1806
artist, historian, critic
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Irish historian, portrait painter, and critic. After early training in Cork, Barry studied in Dublin at West's Academy where he was awarded a premium for his painting The Baptism of the King of Cashel by St Patrick at the Exhibition of the Dublin Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce. He came to the attention of Edmund Burke, who paid for the young man to study in London, and subsequently in Paris and Rome. In 1775 he was elected to the Royal Academy, and in 1782 made professor of painting. His most ambitious paintings are a series commemorating 'The Progress of Human Culture' to decorate the Great Room of the (Royal) Society of Arts in the Adelphi. The final painting, Elysium and Tartarus or the State of Final Retribution is a large canvass encompassing 125 figures from history celebrated for their contributions to humanity. Barry died destitute in London after a series of illnesses.
James G. Douglas
1887 - 1954
politician
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a member of the constitution committee of 1922 senator (1922-36; 1938-43; 1944-54), vice-chairman of Senate 1922-25 and chairman of the joint committee of the Dail and Senate on standing orders
Jose Maria Heredia
1842 - 1905
writer
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French poet, a leading exponent of the poetic ideals of the Parnassians , b. Cuba. His reputation rests on Les Troph?es (1893), containing 118 masterful sonnets in the Petrarchan manner.
Lady Augusta Gregory
1859 - 1932
writer
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b Co Galway; playwright, collector of folk
material, translator, co-founder of the Abbey
Theatre. In 1880 she married the Rt Hon Sir William
Gregory in Dublin. In 1892 William Gregory died, and
two years later she met WB Yeats. In 1897 Yeats
spent the first of twenty summers at Coole Park,
Lady Gregory's home. In 1899 she and Yeats founded
the Irish Literary Theatre, which later became the
Abbey Theatre, in which she continued to be involved
until her death. In 1921 the reconstituted Irish
Advisory Committee of the Carnegie United Kingdom
Trust was established, with Lady Gregory as one of
its members. Through the Trust, she began a short
(probably through 1925), but amicable working
relationship with MacGreevy.
Lennox Robinson
1886 - 1958
writer
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b Co Cork; also known as Tinche. In 1897, after seeing an Abbey production at the Cork Opera House, Robinson began to write plays. His first play, 'The Clancy Name, a Tragedy in One Act,' was performed on 8 October 1908 at the Abbey in Dublin. In 1909 Robinson was appointed producer of plays and manager of the Abbey by WB Yeats and Lady Gregory.In 1915 Robinson was hired by the Carnegie United Kingdom Trust to act as part-time Organising Librarian for Newcastle West and Rathkeale (See CUKT). In 1919 Robinson met MacGreevy, and in 1920 when he was hired as Secretary to the newly-established Irish Advisory Committee of the CUKT, he recommended MacGreevy to the Committee as Assistant Secretary. MacGreevy remained Assistant Secretary until 1925, when the Irish Advisory Committee was dissolved due to pressure from the Church. On 8 September 1930, Robinson married Dolly Travers Smith, a union which seemed to have surprised everyone who knew them well. MacGreevy took the announcement of the engagement particularly badly, yet, resumed his friendship with Dolly and Lennox, albeit not at the level previously enjoyed. Even before Robinson's marriage to Dolly Travers Smith, MacGreevy and Robinson's relationship seemed to alternate between love and hate. Nevertheless, MacGreevy and Robinson remained in correspondence until Robinson's death..
Leonardo da Vinci
1452 - 1519
artist, scientist
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Italian painter, sculptor, architect, engineer, and scientist. Apprenticed to Andrea Verrocchio (c.1470). He came under the patronage of Lorenzo de Medici and in 1472 became a master, and a member of the guild of St. Luke. In (1482-99) became artist and technical advisor on architecture and engineering to Ludovico Sforza, Duke of Milan. In 1502 he became military engineer to Cesare Borgia. Worked in Florence (1503-06), Milan (1505-13), Rome (1513-16). In 1517 he joined the court of the French king Francis I, he lived at the royal Chateau de Cloux, near Ambroise, until his death. He is especially noted for the breadth of his genius, as he left many notebooks containing his researches into anatomy, architecture, hydraulics, hydrology, geology, meteorology, mechanics, machinery and gears, military weaponry and fortifications, human and avian flight, optics, mathematics and botany. He was a master of expression, and the use of light and shadow. He painted two Annunciations (c.1472-77), Madonna and Child (c.1474), Portrait of a Young Lady (c.1475-78), St. Jerome (c.1480), Adoration of the Magi (1481), two Virgin of the Rocks (1483, 1508), Lady with an Ermine (c.1490), Last Supper (1495-97), Virgin and Child with St. Ann (1500), Madonna with Yarn-winder (1501), Mona Lisa (1503-06), Battle of Anghiari (1503-06), and St. John the Baptist (c.1516).
Marcus Antonius
83 - 31
leader
Oscar Wilde
1854 - 1900
writer
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writer and playwright
Paul Valery
1871 - 1945
writer
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French poet, essayist, and critic. Valéry
is famous not only for his literary works such as La
Soirée avec Monsieur Teste, and symbolist and
post-symbolist poetry, but for the vast analytic
enterprise of his Cahiers, hundreds of notebooks
written nearly every day at dawn for over 50 years
without thought of publication. MacGreevy was
introduced to Valéry by William Stewart in
1926, when Valéry was at the height of his
fame. MacGreevy was taken with his work and began
translating his Introduction à la méthode de
Léonard de Vinci (1895) into English. After
several years of having difficulty in finding
a publisher, John Rodker brought out the
translation, to largely favourable reviews,
in April 1929.
Pierre Louys
1870 - 1925
writer
Saint Augustine
354 - 430
religious figure
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Early Christian church father and philosopher. Born in Roman North Africa of a Christian mother and pagan father. Was educated in Latin literature, and from 374-387 taught rhetoric in Carthage, Rome and Milan. After an early period of doubt and spiritual crisis, in which he joined the Manichaeans, he converted to Christianity and was baptised in 387. He was ordained a priest in 391, and from 396-430 was Bishop of Hippo. His sermons, pastoral letters and books exerted a great influence throughout the Christian world. His widely-read Confessions (c400) document his spiritual crisis, belief and faith.
Sappho
writer
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poet, active 650 BCE - 590 BCE
Sean O'Faolain
1900 - 1991
writer
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Irish short story writer, novelist, essayist, travel writer, biographer and leading figure of the Irish literary renaissance. Born John Whelan, he Gaelicized his name in 1918, partly in response to the Easter Rising of 1916. Educated at University College at Cork of National University of Ireland and Harvard University, O'Faolain joined the Irish Volunteers and was involved in the IRA. He published four novels and several volumes of travel writing, but is best known as a short story writer and published more than a dozen collections of stories.

Source: Literature Resource Center
Sir F. Eldred Pottinger Smith-Gordon
1889 - 1976
economist
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an economist, was a librarian for the Co-Operative Reference Library and in 1926 appointed to the Banking Commission of D?il ?ireann; author of Co-operation for Farmers (1918), with Laurence C. Staples, Rural Reconstruction in Ireland: A Record of Co-operative Organisation (1917) and two volumes with Cruise O'Brien, Co-operation in many lands (1919) and Co-operation in Ireland (1921).
Thomas MacGreevy
1893 - 1967
critic, museum director, writer
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Poet, literary and art critic, and administrator. Born in Tarbert, Co. Kerry, into a family of farmers and schoolteachers; educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he studied politics and history.He is best known for his strikingly original modernist poetry and for being one of the art critics who championed Irish modernist art and artists between the wars.

He was a prolific writer, publishing more than 350 articles, seven monographs, and a collection of poetry, Poems (1934). He was director of the National Gallery of Ireland, 1950-1963.

Source: The Encyclopedia of Ireland
T S Eliot
1888 - 1965
writer
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b St Louis; poet, playwright and critic. Eliot moved to London in 1914 and resided there until his death, becoming a British subject in 1927. MacGreevy met Eliot in May 1925 through a letter of introduction from WB Yeats. Eliot was generous to MacGreevy, taking articles and book reviews regularly from him for The Criterion from 1925-27, and again in 1934, as well as being one of the first to publish his poetry. The two men formed a professional relationship which bordered on the personal. Eliot was very supportive of MacGreevy, writing several letters of introduction for him for various job opportunities. MacGreevy was also one of the earliest critics of Eliot's poetry when in 1931 Chatto & Windus published his monograph TS Eliot. MacGreevy and Eliot's relationship cooled between 1928-32 when MacGreevy's friendship with Richard Aldington was at its peak, as Aldington's dislike for Eliot seemed to have rubbed off on MacGreevy.
WB Yeats
1865 - 1939
writer
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Born William Butler Yeats in Sandymount, Dublin; poet, playwright, and co-founder of the Abbey Theatre. Brother of painter, Jack B. Yeats. In 1886 'Mosada: A Dramatic Poem' was published, and two years later 'Poems and Ballads of Young Ireland' and 'Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry.' Yeats's interest in theatre began in the early 1890s, coinciding with his interest in Irish legends and his studies of the occult. By Yeats's mid-thirties, his reputation as a poet was firmly established, not only in Ireland, but in England and the United States. By the time MacGreevy met Yeats, perhaps as early as 1919, Yeats was at the height of his powers. MacGreevy soon became an intimate of the Yeats family, often calling into their house on Merrion Square in the evenings. It is not clear why his friendship with the Yeatses cooled in the 1930s, and by the time he moved back to Dublin in 1941, renewing his friendship with George Yeats, WB Yeats had died.