Alan Duncan
1895 - 1943
journalist, military
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b Dublin; son of Ellen and James Duncan. Served in Gallipoli as a Captain with the Royal Welch Fusiliers. After contracting dysentery in 1916 he was transferred to a military camp at Aldershot in charge of conscientious objectors at their courts martial. After the war Duncan returned to Dublin, working variously as an arts journalist, in administration at the Abbey Theatre, WB Yeats's secretary, and as a tour guide for Lunn's Travel Agency. M probably met Duncan in 1919 or 1920 and the two formed a warm friendship. In April 1924 Duncan married Belinda Atkinson, and early in 1925 the couple moved to Paris, becoming part of the Irish expatriate circle which included Joyce, and eventually M and Beckett.
Constant Lambert
1905 - 1950
composer
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b London; composer, conductor and writer on music; educated at Christ's Hospital (1915-22), and the Royal College of Music on scholarship. Some of his early interests were French and Russian music, particularly for the ballet. He had a wide circle of writer-friends that included the Sitwells. By 1926, the year he met M, he had been introduced to Diaghileff, and was the first English composer to write for the Ballets Russes. Lambert met M in July 1926 when he became a fellow lodger in Hester Travers Smith's home. By late summer he was writing a ballet for Nijinska, who was directing a company performing at the Teatro Col?n in Buenos Aires. The ballet, which was ultimately entitled Pomona, had a libretto written by M based on the myth of Vertumnus and Pomona. M and Lambert's friendship, never a close one, further deteriorated in 1928 over the first English production of the ballet, and royalties due on publication of Pomona by Oxford University Press.
Dolly Robinson
1901 - 1977
artist
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b Dublin also known as Dolche; met MacGreevy in 1919, most likely in January or February while MacGreevy was still in uniform. She was a painter, and a stage and costume designer, having designed many Abbey sets in the 1920s and 1930s. She became one of MacGreevy's closest female friends, although in 1920 she moved with her mother to London. Their friendship deepened, however, when MacGreevy lodged at her mother's house in Cheyne Gardens between 1925-27. In 1930 she married Lennox Robinson and moved to Robinson's home, Sorrento Cottage, in Dalkey, where she established a reputation as an exceptional hostess. She died in Dublin.
Edmond Dulac
1882 - 1953
artist
Fay Compton
1894 - 1978
actor
George Yeats
1893 - 1968
artist, writer
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Born Bertha Georgie Hyde-Lees in Wrexham. Married WB Yeats in October 1917. In 1919 their first child Anne was born, and in 1921, their son Michael. By the early 1920s George Yeats was active in Cuala Industries and The Dublin Drama League. MacGreevy probably met George Yeats in 1919, and they remained friends until MacGreevy's death in 1967.
Gordon Craig
1872 - 1966
actor
Herbert Vincent Reade
1870 - 1929
civil servant
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of Ipsden House, Ipsden, Oxfordshire and 32 Palace Gardens Terrace, Kensington worked in the Board of Customs and Excise; one of George Yeats's oldest friends, he was introduced to MacGreevy by Olivia Shakespear in June 1925.
Hester Meredith Travers-Smith
1868 - 1949
psychic
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Daughter of Edward Dowden, Professor of English Literature at Trinity College Dublin. She was probably introduced to MacGreevy in 1919, and remained intouch with him throughout most of her life. In November 1920 she moved to London, and in 1923 rented a house at 15 Cheyne Gardens. That house, and a later residence at number 17, became MacGreevy's home for the greater part of the time he lived in London (1925-27; 1933-41). Travers Smith was a professional medium, and formed her first circle in 1914. She was conducting a s?ance in the presence of Lennox Robinson when the Lusitania was sunk, and claims to have received a message from Hugh Lane who was one of the drowned. She continued her psychic work in London, writing several books on psychic matters, including one entitled 'Psychic Messages from Oscar Wilde.' She died in London.
Hugh Percy Lane
1875 - 1915
collector
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Irish art dealer and critic. He became a London picture dealer in 1893, and worked with the Marlborough Gallery before setting up for himself. His was immediately successful, and was knighted in (1909). After a meeting with Yeats at the house of his aunt, Lady Gregory, his interest was awakened in the Irish art scene. He lent a collection of modern paintings, mainly French impressionists, to the Dublin Municipal Gallery, on the condition that a permanent Gallery be provided. But with the rejection of a design for a building on a bridge over the Liffey, Lane withdrew his Loan, and made a will in 1913 bequeathing the paintings to the English National Gallery. In 1914 he was appointed director of the National Gallery of Ireland, and in 1915 he added an unwitnesed codicil to his will restoring his collection to Dublin. He drowned on the Lusitania on May 7th 1915. His death caused a controversy over the disposition of his collection of paintings, which was finally divided between Dublin and London.
Ivor Novello
1893 - 1951
composer
Lennox Robinson
1886 - 1958
writer
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b Co Cork; also known as Tinche. In 1897, after seeing an Abbey production at the Cork Opera House, Robinson began to write plays. His first play, 'The Clancy Name, a Tragedy in One Act,' was performed on 8 October 1908 at the Abbey in Dublin. In 1909 Robinson was appointed producer of plays and manager of the Abbey by WB Yeats and Lady Gregory.In 1915 Robinson was hired by the Carnegie United Kingdom Trust to act as part-time Organising Librarian for Newcastle West and Rathkeale (See CUKT). In 1919 Robinson met MacGreevy, and in 1920 when he was hired as Secretary to the newly-established Irish Advisory Committee of the CUKT, he recommended MacGreevy to the Committee as Assistant Secretary. MacGreevy remained Assistant Secretary until 1925, when the Irish Advisory Committee was dissolved due to pressure from the Church. On 8 September 1930, Robinson married Dolly Travers Smith, a union which seemed to have surprised everyone who knew them well. MacGreevy took the announcement of the engagement particularly badly, yet, resumed his friendship with Dolly and Lennox, albeit not at the level previously enjoyed. Even before Robinson's marriage to Dolly Travers Smith, MacGreevy and Robinson's relationship seemed to alternate between love and hate. Nevertheless, MacGreevy and Robinson remained in correspondence until Robinson's death..
Margaret Morris
1891 - 1980
dancer, physiotherapist
Maurice Prosper Lambert
1901 - 1964
artist
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British sculptor
Olivia Shakespear
1863 - 1938
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One time companion of WB Yeats, she was probably introduced to M through Yeats. M and Shakespear's friendship seemed slight, but amicable.
Osbert Sitwell
1892 - 1969
writer
Roger Fry
1866 - 1934
artist, critic
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English painter and critic. He was deeply struck
by Post-Impressionism after an early career
concerned with the works of Italian Renaissance art.
He organised the first exhibition of
Post-Impressionism in Britain in 1910. His works
include Vision and Design (1920), Transformations
(1926), Cézanne (1927), and Henri Matisse (1927).
Thomas MacGreevy
1893 - 1967
critic, museum director, writer
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Poet, literary and art critic, and administrator. Born in Tarbert, Co. Kerry, into a family of farmers and schoolteachers; educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he studied politics and history.He is best known for his strikingly original modernist poetry and for being one of the art critics who championed Irish modernist art and artists between the wars.

He was a prolific writer, publishing more than 350 articles, seven monographs, and a collection of poetry, Poems (1934). He was director of the National Gallery of Ireland, 1950-1963.

Source: The Encyclopedia of Ireland
T S Eliot
1888 - 1965
writer
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b St Louis; poet, playwright and critic. Eliot moved to London in 1914 and resided there until his death, becoming a British subject in 1927. MacGreevy met Eliot in May 1925 through a letter of introduction from WB Yeats. Eliot was generous to MacGreevy, taking articles and book reviews regularly from him for The Criterion from 1925-27, and again in 1934, as well as being one of the first to publish his poetry. The two men formed a professional relationship which bordered on the personal. Eliot was very supportive of MacGreevy, writing several letters of introduction for him for various job opportunities. MacGreevy was also one of the earliest critics of Eliot's poetry when in 1931 Chatto & Windus published his monograph TS Eliot. MacGreevy and Eliot's relationship cooled between 1928-32 when MacGreevy's friendship with Richard Aldington was at its peak, as Aldington's dislike for Eliot seemed to have rubbed off on MacGreevy.
Vivien Eliot
- 1947
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First wife of TS Eliot, whom she married in 1915 after a two-month courtship. She was later institutionalized for many years before her death in 1947.
WB Yeats
1865 - 1939
writer
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Born William Butler Yeats in Sandymount, Dublin; poet, playwright, and co-founder of the Abbey Theatre. Brother of painter, Jack B. Yeats. In 1886 'Mosada: A Dramatic Poem' was published, and two years later 'Poems and Ballads of Young Ireland' and 'Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry.' Yeats's interest in theatre began in the early 1890s, coinciding with his interest in Irish legends and his studies of the occult. By Yeats's mid-thirties, his reputation as a poet was firmly established, not only in Ireland, but in England and the United States. By the time MacGreevy met Yeats, perhaps as early as 1919, Yeats was at the height of his powers. MacGreevy soon became an intimate of the Yeats family, often calling into their house on Merrion Square in the evenings. It is not clear why his friendship with the Yeatses cooled in the 1930s, and by the time he moved back to Dublin in 1941, renewing his friendship with George Yeats, WB Yeats had died.
William McCausland Stewart
1900 - 1989
academic
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MacGreevy met Stewart while the two men were
studying at Trinity College Dublin. Stewart took his
BA in 1922, and his MA in 1926. In 1923 he became
lecteur d'Anglais at the Ecole Normale
Supérieure, a post he held until December
1926, when he became a lecturer in French at the
University of Sheffield. When Stewart left the
Ecole, he recommended MacGreevy to the authorities
as his replacement. Although MacGreevy and Stewart's
correspondence seems to have died out c 1930, they
probably renewed their friendship in the 1950s and
1960s when Stewart returned to Dublin as an external
examiner. After Sheffield, Stewart went on to have a
very successful career as an academic in
universities such as the University of St Andrews
and Bristol.
William Michael Yeats
1921
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Son of WB Yeats and George Yeats