Aeschylus
525 - 456
writer
Alfred Cortot
1877 - 1962
composer, musician
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pianist
Aodh Ruadh O Domhnaill
1571 - 1602
leader
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Irish Chieftain
Dolly Robinson
1901 - 1977
artist
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b Dublin also known as Dolche; met MacGreevy in 1919, most likely in January or February while MacGreevy was still in uniform. She was a painter, and a stage and costume designer, having designed many Abbey sets in the 1920s and 1930s. She became one of MacGreevy's closest female friends, although in 1920 she moved with her mother to London. Their friendship deepened, however, when MacGreevy lodged at her mother's house in Cheyne Gardens between 1925-27. In 1930 she married Lennox Robinson and moved to Robinson's home, Sorrento Cottage, in Dalkey, where she established a reputation as an exceptional hostess. She died in Dublin.
Edward Dowden
1843 - 1913
academic
Enrico Caruso
1873 - 1921
singer
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opera singer
Eugene Ysaye
1858 - 1931
composer
Fryderyk Chopin
1810 - 1849
musician, composer
George Yeats
1893 - 1968
artist, writer
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Born Bertha Georgie Hyde-Lees in Wrexham. Married WB Yeats in October 1917. In 1919 their first child Anne was born, and in 1921, their son Michael. By the early 1920s George Yeats was active in Cuala Industries and The Dublin Drama League. MacGreevy probably met George Yeats in 1919, and they remained friends until MacGreevy's death in 1967.
Gordon Roe
editor
Hester Meredith Travers-Smith
1868 - 1949
psychic
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Daughter of Edward Dowden, Professor of English Literature at Trinity College Dublin. She was probably introduced to MacGreevy in 1919, and remained intouch with him throughout most of her life. In November 1920 she moved to London, and in 1923 rented a house at 15 Cheyne Gardens. That house, and a later residence at number 17, became MacGreevy's home for the greater part of the time he lived in London (1925-27; 1933-41). Travers Smith was a professional medium, and formed her first circle in 1914. She was conducting a s?ance in the presence of Lennox Robinson when the Lusitania was sunk, and claims to have received a message from Hugh Lane who was one of the drowned. She continued her psychic work in London, writing several books on psychic matters, including one entitled 'Psychic Messages from Oscar Wilde.' She died in London.
Hieronymus Bosch
1450 - 1516
artist
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(Hieronymus van Aeken; c1450-1516) Dutch painter.
His work is regarded as one of the last expressions
of the medieval world view. Bosch primarily painted
religious scenes. He made use of allegory and
symbolism against a panoramic landscape. For
example, his Garden of Earthly Delights is a
grotesque panorama of religious iconography. His use
of contemporary symbolism, which could be read by
his contemporaries, has been lost to subsequent
generations and has led to contradictory
interpretations of his work. Much of his original
work is now lost, copies have been made and his
signature forged. However The Haywain and The Garden
of Delights are fully authenticated. After his death
a large portion of his work including The Garden of
Delights was taken to Spain by Phillip II
Humbert Wolfe
1886 - 1940
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poet; born in Milan, Italy
Ignace Joseph Pleyel
1757 - 1831
composer
Isaac Albeniz
1860 - 1909
composer
Jelly Eva d'Aranyi
1895 - 1966
musician
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Hungarian violinist. Made her debut playing with her sister Adila Fachiri in Vienna in 1908. Later she became a British citizen. In 1922 and 1923 with Bartok she gave the first London performance of his two violin sonatas. She was also the first soloist in Ravel's Tzigane (1924) and Vaughan William's violin concerto (1925). Both these works and the Bartok concertos were dedicated to her
Johannes Brahms
1833 - 1897
composer, musician
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German composer and pianist. Encouraged by Schumann, his music was in the German Romantic style. In 1860 he signed a manifesto opposing 'new music' methods adopted by Liszt, and from then was regarded as diametrically opposite to the Wagner school of German music. He moved to Vienna in 1862 where he remained for 35 years. He conducted the Vienna Singakadamie 1863-64 and in 1872 succeeded Rubinstein as art director of the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde, a post he held until 1875. In his lifetime he wrote four symphonies, four concertos and numerous other works for piano and other instruments. He also wrote nearly 200 songs.
Johann Sebastian Bach
1685 - 1750
composer
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German composer and organist. Known for his large library of church, vocal and instrumental music.
Lennox Robinson
1886 - 1958
writer
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b Co Cork; also known as Tinche. In 1897, after seeing an Abbey production at the Cork Opera House, Robinson began to write plays. His first play, 'The Clancy Name, a Tragedy in One Act,' was performed on 8 October 1908 at the Abbey in Dublin. In 1909 Robinson was appointed producer of plays and manager of the Abbey by WB Yeats and Lady Gregory.In 1915 Robinson was hired by the Carnegie United Kingdom Trust to act as part-time Organising Librarian for Newcastle West and Rathkeale (See CUKT). In 1919 Robinson met MacGreevy, and in 1920 when he was hired as Secretary to the newly-established Irish Advisory Committee of the CUKT, he recommended MacGreevy to the Committee as Assistant Secretary. MacGreevy remained Assistant Secretary until 1925, when the Irish Advisory Committee was dissolved due to pressure from the Church. On 8 September 1930, Robinson married Dolly Travers Smith, a union which seemed to have surprised everyone who knew them well. MacGreevy took the announcement of the engagement particularly badly, yet, resumed his friendship with Dolly and Lennox, albeit not at the level previously enjoyed. Even before Robinson's marriage to Dolly Travers Smith, MacGreevy and Robinson's relationship seemed to alternate between love and hate. Nevertheless, MacGreevy and Robinson remained in correspondence until Robinson's death..
Leonard Woolf
1880 - 1969
publisher
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Was a civil servant in Ceylon from 1904-11. In 1912 he married Virginia Stephen, and five years later they founded The Hogarth Press. He was also editor of 'The Nation' (1923-30). M was introduced to Woolf through TS Eliot in 1925, and until M left for Paris (Feb 1927) Woolf gave him small literary reviews to do on a fairly regular basis. In 1928 M submitted a collection of poetry to The Hogarth Press which was ultimately rejected by Lady Gerald Wellesley, their poetry editor at the time.
Lucrezia Bori
1887 - 1960
singer
Olivia Shakespear
1863 - 1938
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One time companion of WB Yeats, she was probably introduced to M through Yeats. M and Shakespear's friendship seemed slight, but amicable.
Paul Valery
1871 - 1945
writer
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French poet, essayist, and critic. Valéry
is famous not only for his literary works such as La
Soirée avec Monsieur Teste, and symbolist and
post-symbolist poetry, but for the vast analytic
enterprise of his Cahiers, hundreds of notebooks
written nearly every day at dawn for over 50 years
without thought of publication. MacGreevy was
introduced to Valéry by William Stewart in
1926, when Valéry was at the height of his
fame. MacGreevy was taken with his work and began
translating his Introduction à la méthode de
Léonard de Vinci (1895) into English. After
several years of having difficulty in finding
a publisher, John Rodker brought out the
translation, to largely favourable reviews,
in April 1929.
Reginald Grundy
editor
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(fl 1925-33) was editor of The Connoisseur during
the time MacGreevy worked on the publication
(1925-27). MacGreevy served first on the staff, and
later as Assistant Editor, writing many book and art
reviews. The extent of MacGreevy's contribution to
The Connoisseur can not be ascertained as most of
his articles were unsigned and none of the
magazine's records seem to have been preserved.
Sophocles
496 - 406
writer
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playwright
Thomas MacGreevy
1893 - 1967
critic, museum director, writer
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Poet, literary and art critic, and administrator. Born in Tarbert, Co. Kerry, into a family of farmers and schoolteachers; educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he studied politics and history.He is best known for his strikingly original modernist poetry and for being one of the art critics who championed Irish modernist art and artists between the wars.

He was a prolific writer, publishing more than 350 articles, seven monographs, and a collection of poetry, Poems (1934). He was director of the National Gallery of Ireland, 1950-1963.

Source: The Encyclopedia of Ireland
T S Eliot
1888 - 1965
writer
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b St Louis; poet, playwright and critic. Eliot moved to London in 1914 and resided there until his death, becoming a British subject in 1927. MacGreevy met Eliot in May 1925 through a letter of introduction from WB Yeats. Eliot was generous to MacGreevy, taking articles and book reviews regularly from him for The Criterion from 1925-27, and again in 1934, as well as being one of the first to publish his poetry. The two men formed a professional relationship which bordered on the personal. Eliot was very supportive of MacGreevy, writing several letters of introduction for him for various job opportunities. MacGreevy was also one of the earliest critics of Eliot's poetry when in 1931 Chatto & Windus published his monograph TS Eliot. MacGreevy and Eliot's relationship cooled between 1928-32 when MacGreevy's friendship with Richard Aldington was at its peak, as Aldington's dislike for Eliot seemed to have rubbed off on MacGreevy.
Walter Rummel
1887 - 1953
composer, musician
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b Berlin; pianist and composer, som of the British pianist Franz Rummel and grandson of Samuel F.B. Morse, inventor of the telegraph; although an American citizen, most of his life was spent in Europe, where he was a friend of Debussy, premiering ten of his piano works, and of Ezra Pound, three of whose poems he set to music. In 1924 M reviewed a concert by Rummel held in Dublin. He was probably introduced to Rummel through George Yeats, who was a close friend, along with her mother and Olivia Shakespear. At Dulac's request he composed music for WBY's The Dreaming of the Bones.
WB Yeats
1865 - 1939
writer
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Born William Butler Yeats in Sandymount, Dublin; poet, playwright, and co-founder of the Abbey Theatre. Brother of painter, Jack B. Yeats. In 1886 'Mosada: A Dramatic Poem' was published, and two years later 'Poems and Ballads of Young Ireland' and 'Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry.' Yeats's interest in theatre began in the early 1890s, coinciding with his interest in Irish legends and his studies of the occult. By Yeats's mid-thirties, his reputation as a poet was firmly established, not only in Ireland, but in England and the United States. By the time MacGreevy met Yeats, perhaps as early as 1919, Yeats was at the height of his powers. MacGreevy soon became an intimate of the Yeats family, often calling into their house on Merrion Square in the evenings. It is not clear why his friendship with the Yeatses cooled in the 1930s, and by the time he moved back to Dublin in 1941, renewing his friendship with George Yeats, WB Yeats had died.
William McCausland Stewart
1900 - 1989
academic
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MacGreevy met Stewart while the two men were
studying at Trinity College Dublin. Stewart took his
BA in 1922, and his MA in 1926. In 1923 he became
lecteur d'Anglais at the Ecole Normale
Supérieure, a post he held until December
1926, when he became a lecturer in French at the
University of Sheffield. When Stewart left the
Ecole, he recommended MacGreevy to the authorities
as his replacement. Although MacGreevy and Stewart's
correspondence seems to have died out c 1930, they
probably renewed their friendship in the 1950s and
1960s when Stewart returned to Dublin as an external
examiner. After Sheffield, Stewart went on to have a
very successful career as an academic in
universities such as the University of St Andrews
and Bristol.