Aeschylus
525 - 456
writer
Aodh Ruadh O Domhnaill
1571 - 1602
leader
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Irish Chieftain
Darius Milhaud
1892 - 1974
composer
George Antheil
1900 - 1959
composer, musician
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b Trenton, NJ; composer known for his ultramodern compositions, such as Zingareska (1921) and Ballet m?chanique (scored for player pianos, automobile horns, aeroplane propeller, etc.) which created a sensation at its Paris debut in 1926. MacGreevy probably met Antheil in 1928 or 1929. It is difficult to determine how close a friendship existed between the two men as only one letter, dated May 1930, survives. In it, Antheil writes that his piece, Fighting the Waves, was dedicated to MacGreevy.
George Yeats
1893 - 1968
artist, writer
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Born Bertha Georgie Hyde-Lees in Wrexham. Married WB Yeats in October 1917. In 1919 their first child Anne was born, and in 1921, their son Michael. By the early 1920s George Yeats was active in Cuala Industries and The Dublin Drama League. MacGreevy probably met George Yeats in 1919, and they remained friends until MacGreevy's death in 1967.
Lennox Robinson
1886 - 1958
writer
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b Co Cork; also known as Tinche. In 1897, after seeing an Abbey production at the Cork Opera House, Robinson began to write plays. His first play, 'The Clancy Name, a Tragedy in One Act,' was performed on 8 October 1908 at the Abbey in Dublin. In 1909 Robinson was appointed producer of plays and manager of the Abbey by WB Yeats and Lady Gregory.In 1915 Robinson was hired by the Carnegie United Kingdom Trust to act as part-time Organising Librarian for Newcastle West and Rathkeale (See CUKT). In 1919 Robinson met MacGreevy, and in 1920 when he was hired as Secretary to the newly-established Irish Advisory Committee of the CUKT, he recommended MacGreevy to the Committee as Assistant Secretary. MacGreevy remained Assistant Secretary until 1925, when the Irish Advisory Committee was dissolved due to pressure from the Church. On 8 September 1930, Robinson married Dolly Travers Smith, a union which seemed to have surprised everyone who knew them well. MacGreevy took the announcement of the engagement particularly badly, yet, resumed his friendship with Dolly and Lennox, albeit not at the level previously enjoyed. Even before Robinson's marriage to Dolly Travers Smith, MacGreevy and Robinson's relationship seemed to alternate between love and hate. Nevertheless, MacGreevy and Robinson remained in correspondence until Robinson's death..
Paul-Louis-Charles-Marie Claudel
1868 - 1955
writer
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Dramatist
Sean O'Casey
1880 - 1964
writer
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playwright
Thomas MacGreevy
1893 - 1967
critic, museum director, writer
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Poet, literary and art critic, and administrator. Born in Tarbert, Co. Kerry, into a family of farmers and schoolteachers; educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he studied politics and history.He is best known for his strikingly original modernist poetry and for being one of the art critics who championed Irish modernist art and artists between the wars.

He was a prolific writer, publishing more than 350 articles, seven monographs, and a collection of poetry, Poems (1934). He was director of the National Gallery of Ireland, 1950-1963.

Source: The Encyclopedia of Ireland
T S Eliot
1888 - 1965
writer
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b St Louis; poet, playwright and critic. Eliot moved to London in 1914 and resided there until his death, becoming a British subject in 1927. MacGreevy met Eliot in May 1925 through a letter of introduction from WB Yeats. Eliot was generous to MacGreevy, taking articles and book reviews regularly from him for The Criterion from 1925-27, and again in 1934, as well as being one of the first to publish his poetry. The two men formed a professional relationship which bordered on the personal. Eliot was very supportive of MacGreevy, writing several letters of introduction for him for various job opportunities. MacGreevy was also one of the earliest critics of Eliot's poetry when in 1931 Chatto & Windus published his monograph TS Eliot. MacGreevy and Eliot's relationship cooled between 1928-32 when MacGreevy's friendship with Richard Aldington was at its peak, as Aldington's dislike for Eliot seemed to have rubbed off on MacGreevy.
WB Yeats
1865 - 1939
writer
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Born William Butler Yeats in Sandymount, Dublin; poet, playwright, and co-founder of the Abbey Theatre. Brother of painter, Jack B. Yeats. In 1886 'Mosada: A Dramatic Poem' was published, and two years later 'Poems and Ballads of Young Ireland' and 'Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry.' Yeats's interest in theatre began in the early 1890s, coinciding with his interest in Irish legends and his studies of the occult. By Yeats's mid-thirties, his reputation as a poet was firmly established, not only in Ireland, but in England and the United States. By the time MacGreevy met Yeats, perhaps as early as 1919, Yeats was at the height of his powers. MacGreevy soon became an intimate of the Yeats family, often calling into their house on Merrion Square in the evenings. It is not clear why his friendship with the Yeatses cooled in the 1930s, and by the time he moved back to Dublin in 1941, renewing his friendship with George Yeats, WB Yeats had died.
Wilfred Owen
1893 - 1918
writer
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poet
Wyndham Lewis
1882 - 1957
writer, artist
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English painter and writer. He first attracted attention before World War I as the Founder of a school of painting called Vorticism. He edited two issues of the Vorticist review Blast (1914-15), which published Ezra Pound's"vorticist manifesto" that promoted a return to classicism in the arts, and rejected trends towards romanticism. His novels and critical writings were radical attacks on contemporary art and society. He served in World War I and was notorious during 1930s for his fascist views but later recanted. He was the art critic for The Listener (1946-51). His paintings included Surrender of Barcelona (1937) and portraits of Dame Edith Sitwell (1935), T.S. Eliot (1938), Ezra Pound (1939). His books included novels Tarr (1918), The Apes of God (1930) and The Revenge for Love (1937). He also published Poems (1933) and several collections of short stories.