Dolly Robinson
1901 - 1977
artist
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-Biographic Note
b Dublin also known as Dolche; met MacGreevy in 1919, most likely in January or February while MacGreevy was still in uniform. She was a painter, and a stage and costume designer, having designed many Abbey sets in the 1920s and 1930s. She became one of MacGreevy's closest female friends, although in 1920 she moved with her mother to London. Their friendship deepened, however, when MacGreevy lodged at her mother's house in Cheyne Gardens between 1925-27. In 1930 she married Lennox Robinson and moved to Robinson's home, Sorrento Cottage, in Dalkey, where she established a reputation as an exceptional hostess. She died in Dublin.
George Yeats
1893 - 1968
artist, writer
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Born Bertha Georgie Hyde-Lees in Wrexham. Married WB Yeats in October 1917. In 1919 their first child Anne was born, and in 1921, their son Michael. By the early 1920s George Yeats was active in Cuala Industries and The Dublin Drama League. MacGreevy probably met George Yeats in 1919, and they remained friends until MacGreevy's death in 1967.
Lady Augusta Gregory
1859 - 1932
writer
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b Co Galway; playwright, collector of folk
material, translator, co-founder of the Abbey
Theatre. In 1880 she married the Rt Hon Sir William
Gregory in Dublin. In 1892 William Gregory died, and
two years later she met WB Yeats. In 1897 Yeats
spent the first of twenty summers at Coole Park,
Lady Gregory's home. In 1899 she and Yeats founded
the Irish Literary Theatre, which later became the
Abbey Theatre, in which she continued to be involved
until her death. In 1921 the reconstituted Irish
Advisory Committee of the Carnegie United Kingdom
Trust was established, with Lady Gregory as one of
its members. Through the Trust, she began a short
(probably through 1925), but amicable working
relationship with MacGreevy.
Sir Alec Martin
1884 - 1971
Art Auctioneer
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Sir Alec Martin was a friend of MacGreevy's in London. He was an art auctioneer and eventually the Director of Christie's.
Thomas Bodkin
1887 - 1961
art critic
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Irish art critic. Educated Belvedere, Clongowes Wood, and the Royal University of Ireland. In 1911 he was called to the Bar and practised for five years before joining the Commission for Charitable Donations and Bequests. In 1917 he became a Governor and Guardian of the National Gallery of Ireland, and in 1927 its Director. MacGreevy also applied for the Directorship in 1927. Bodkin's tenure at the National Gallery was marked by constant wrangling with the Department of Finance which, in time, even Bodkin realised hampered the growth of the Gallery.Thus in December 1934 he resigned, taking a post at the Barber Institute in Birmingham. Bodkin remained in permanent exile, dying in Birmingham.
Thomas MacGreevy
1893 - 1967
critic, museum director, writer
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-Biographic Note
Poet, literary and art critic, and administrator. Born in Tarbert, Co. Kerry, into a family of farmers and schoolteachers; educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he studied politics and history.He is best known for his strikingly original modernist poetry and for being one of the art critics who championed Irish modernist art and artists between the wars.

He was a prolific writer, publishing more than 350 articles, seven monographs, and a collection of poetry, Poems (1934). He was director of the National Gallery of Ireland, 1950-1963.

Source: The Encyclopedia of Ireland
WB Yeats
1865 - 1939
writer
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Born William Butler Yeats in Sandymount, Dublin; poet, playwright, and co-founder of the Abbey Theatre. Brother of painter, Jack B. Yeats. In 1886 'Mosada: A Dramatic Poem' was published, and two years later 'Poems and Ballads of Young Ireland' and 'Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry.' Yeats's interest in theatre began in the early 1890s, coinciding with his interest in Irish legends and his studies of the occult. By Yeats's mid-thirties, his reputation as a poet was firmly established, not only in Ireland, but in England and the United States. By the time MacGreevy met Yeats, perhaps as early as 1919, Yeats was at the height of his powers. MacGreevy soon became an intimate of the Yeats family, often calling into their house on Merrion Square in the evenings. It is not clear why his friendship with the Yeatses cooled in the 1930s, and by the time he moved back to Dublin in 1941, renewing his friendship with George Yeats, WB Yeats had died.